FAQ

Have a question about our Steadyrack vertical bike racks, shipping, returns, warranty policies or something else? You’ll most likely find the answer here. For all other concerns and enquiries please get in touch with our Support Team at support@steadyrack.com

General

We have created multiple Steadyracks to suit various types of bikes. The mounting brackets on our racks are all the same, only the arms have different lengths and widths to cater for various bike sizes. To find the correct Steadyrack for your bike, please visit Our Products page to learn how to accurately measure your bike.

Your tyre is only required to have partial contact with the rest for it to perform its function. Simply place the rear wheel to the side you wish to pivot the bike.

It works universally with all tyre widths, including fat tyres. Narrow tyres will generally sit deeper in the bracket (more than wide tyres).

Yes –  all four of our racks pivot up to 160 degrees, to the left and right.

Yes – our racks can store all bikes, including e-bikes, up to 35kg/77lbs. Specifications and weight limits vary for each rack.

Our Fender Rack was designed to accommodate bikes up to 25kg, with mudguards and fenders. The plastic saddle slips easily in-between a fender/mudguard and front-tyre, meaning no part of the bike comes into contact with the rack.

Thank you for your feedback. This is a question we have been asked in the past. The Rear Tyre Rest that comes with the Fat Rack and Mountain Bike Rack is larger than the regular rest in the other racks. The purpose of the rest is to keep the bikes vertically aligned when using the pivot. When you pivot your bike, the Rear Tyre Rest has been designed so that you can rest the tyre either side (depending on which way you pivot) or in the centre.  So long as part of the tyre makes contact with the rest, it will work as designed. We felt that making a large rest would not aid performance, would look bulky and add unnecessary costs. 

Some of the newer plus size MTB tyres have extra-large shoulder lugs (tread) which take the overall width past the actual measurement marked on the sidewall. If your tyres have extra wide lugs, you can still work to our sizes for our Mountain Bike Rack, but it will be a tighter fit. This might mean you have to push it into the rack and pull harder on the bike to dislodge it when you remove it. To avoid this, we recommend sizing up to the Fat Rack. The bike will sit nicely in the rack, but the front wheel may fall to one side slightly due to the larger gap. This does not affect usability or performance and will make it very easy to unload your bike.

While possible, it is best to work to the weight limits we set for each rack. When loading and unloading your heavier bike, make sure you do not bounce the bike on the front of the rack, and carefully roll it in and out with even pressure. The extra weight and force of rolling a heavier bike onto the Fender Rack could possibly cause the arms to bend. Working to the weights as outlined for each rack will remove any possibility of damaging the rack or your bike.

If you do choose to store a heavier bike in our racks, ensure you closely follow our installation guide, to minimise any risk. It is important to mount the rack in a position where the back tyre of your bike is as close to the floor as possible, to remove excess weight on the rack when rolling the bike in and out. We recommend a 2” clearance under the back tyre for optimum performance.  

We do not recommend storing bikes with wheels less than 16” in diameter in our racks. If you store a bike with smaller wheels, you risk not having the tyre come into contact with the two V-shaped cradling points, meaning the fork will rest on the rack before the tyre.

We found some success with placing Velcro straps on the bottom arm to shorten the distance between the 2 points, however the bikes are not as stable, and you would need to strap the wheel to the upper arm of the rack with Velcro as well. 

Steadyrack Classic, Fat, Fender and Mountain Bike Racks all come in Black only. However, you can customise your racks with our End Caps, which come in red, blue, green, yellow, and grey.

Hanging a bike in Steadyrack will not cause any damage to your wheels. No part of the bike frame touches the rack, only the front tyre, which is cradled in the steel arms.

One of the main features of our design is the fact that it is the most suitable rack for carbon wheels. There is less pressure on the bike than riding it and it is certainly better than hooks. The wheel is cradled between the two V-shaped cradling points created when the arms are folded down and the tyre cushions the wheel and bike. There should be absolutely no need to do any maintenance on your rims or wheels if you use a Steadyrack.

Steadyracks are assembled using a specific tension for the nuts (torque setting = 5nm) that holds the central spine to the top and bottom mounting brackets. This setting is designed to give sufficient tension to the pivot to ensure bikes can be loaded on any angle without the rack moving around too much. When you remove the 2 plastic caps from the top and bottom, the nuts are exposed. You can loosen both nuts to free up the rack more, and equally you can tighten them to lock the rack into position. We recommend you maintain them so the racks are stiff but can still be pivoted. 

The rack can be quite stiff when you use it for the first few times then it loosens up a bit. This is due to the type of fibre washers we use to assist with the stiffening effect.

You can lock your bikes into our racks with a D Lock or Chain lock. This is sufficient to prevent opportunist theft and adequate if your bikes are stored in a private carpark. If your bikes are in a location fully accessible to the public, we recommend installing a bracket or a steel rail to the wall underneath the rack to attach a locking device to. As with everything, take caution when storing your bike in a public place, as professional thieves can generally get around any locking system.

It is not possible to lock the rack solid in one position. However, you can tighten the nuts so the rack will become stiff and will effectively hold it in the one position. To do this, first remove the two plastic mounting bracket covers (End Caps). Next, tighten the two nuts that attach the central pivot bar to the mounting brackets. If you follow these steps, we recommend checking your fixings carefully and making sure they are very secure as any sideways pressure on the rack could damage the mounting bracket.

No, you can load and unload the bike at any angle.

This depends on the width of your handlebars and the pedals. The rack will fold as close to the wall as the handlebars and pedals allow. Usually, the handlebars will be the widest point unless they are very narrow - as is the case with some road bikes.

A normal road bike bar would protrude about 400mm or 16 inches from the wall. Mountain bikes with wider bars can be around 1m or 39 inches.

Yes our racks are ideal for apartment buildings where the parking is in a secure environment and not exposed directly to the elements. 

Yes! This a common concern for many bike owners with these types of brakes and suspension. When your bike is hung up vertically, the fluid in your forks will run towards the seals and keep them lubricated. This will prolong their use, so it’s actually good for your bike and forks to hang it vertically on our bike racks. If you have hydraulic brakes on your bike, the fluid will run down when the bike is hung, so we advise pumping the brakes a few times when you take the bike off the rack if it’s been there for a while. The shocks shouldn’t leak when the bike is hung up, however if they do then it’s a
good indication that the seals might need replacing. 

Yes – however you will most likely need a Fender Rack. If you have an aero bike you will need to measure the gap between the down tube and tyre (you can see this measurement here). For most bike this will be more than 10mm, however if your distance is less than this, you will need a Fender Rack. This is because the rubber end on the Fender Rack can easily fit between your tyre and down tube and won’t damage your frame.

By storing your bikes vertically with a Steadyrack, you’ll be able to pivot the bikes up to 160 degrees in each direction, placing them closer to the wall. This will not only save floor space, but also more space in smaller areas, which is helpful when sharing the space with a car. Being able to pivot the racks side to side, when combined with the arm design, allows for much greater location flexibility and space saving than any other product. Steadyracks patented and revolutionary design helps to save more of your valuable floor space and can be mounted to virtually any wall, with as little as 350mm between each rack. Due to the rotating/pivoting action, bikes that are stored in a Steadyrack can be overlapped and when not in use, the arms simply fold away for even more space. 

Steadyracks are suitable for transporting bikes however the bikes must be tied to the racks using velcro straps or similar, to prevent excessive load being placed on the rack during transit. If the bikes bounce up and down when stored in the rack, this can cause the arms to bend and bike to dislodge.

The racks are made from zinc coated high grade mild steel and UV treated plastic.

All Steadyrack products have been designed in Australia. Our products are manufactured in China.

Yes, please send an email to support@steadyrack.com and we will be able to provide you with information about parts. 

Please send an email to support@steadyrack.com and we will be able to provide you with information about any dealers near you. 

We can ship products anywhere in the world. If your city/country is not listed on our site please contact support@steadyrack.com with your details and we can arrange a shipping quote for you. 

Shipping and delivery times vary depending on your country, region, and location. Your estimated shipping delivery time will display at the checkout. However, please keep in mind that these may not consider courier operating days, public holidays, and other delivery variables. Once you have placed your order online, it can take anywhere from 1 – 3 business days to process your order.

Please visit our Dealer or Distributor page and one of our sales team members will be in touch shortly.

Design and Installation

Our design guides and spacing guides are available to download on our website

Each rack is supplied with:

1x plastic rear wheel rest/bracket, which should be fixed to the wall in line with your rear wheel axle (see our installation instructions and videos for more information).

4x bolts and plugs for installing the rack.

2x smaller screws and plugs for the rear tyre rest/bracket.

Installation instructions

1 year free warranty

Visit our installation advice page for more details.

Spacing your racks depends on whether you want to save floor space, wall space, or a bit of both. This is a rough guide to how you should approach the planning of your installation.

Save Floor Space 

If you want to save floor space, you will need to hang your racks further apart so you can utilise the pivot to fold them closer to the wall. If you want to fold them over as much as possible then it’s best to space them far enough apart so that bikes won’t touch the rack next to it when its
folded. 

Save Wall Space 

If you want to save wall space, you can hang them closer together. Note, the closer they are to each other, the less they will be able to pivot before touching the bikes either side of the one you are accessing. You may also need to stagger the heights (one up and one down) to avoid the handlebars touching each other. The good thing about our design is that you can put your bikes as close as 350mm apart and in some instances even closer, but you can still create an access space by pivoting the bikes either side.

Save Both

We have found that spacing your racks all the same height and about 600mm or 2 feet apart will give you a bit of both. The bikes can be folded over the top of each other but will only protrude into your floor space about half as much as they would if they were at right angles. Often that means you can get a car into your parking space alongside your bikes.

This is a guide only, so we recommend that you check the size of your bikes, the type and width of handlebars and the wall and floor space you have available. For more information on Spacing visit our Installation Advice page

All Steadyracks are supplied with 10mm Hex bolts and masonry wall plugs for the racks and 8mm screws and wall plugs for the rear tyre rest. Wall plugs are for masonry use only.

Please visit our Installation Advice page for detailed instructions.

As metric fixings don't always have an exact drill bit size match in various regions, if you are unsure we advise you to take the wall plugs provided with your rack to your local hardware store or expert, and ask them for the right size drill bit for your equipment and installation. Please keep in mind you will need a different size for the rear tyre rest. 

At the most, you will only need to use 4. Each Steadyrack comes with 4x bolts and plugs for installing the rack and 2x smaller screws and plugs for the rear tyre rest. *Wall plugs for masonry use only. Not for timber.

There are four mounting holes on each mounting plate and you will only need to use two of these holes to fix your rack to the wall or frame. The two vertically aligned holes are for fixing to studs and the two horizontally aligned holes are for fixing into masonry or other solid surfaces.

Steadyracks cannot be fixed to any fragile surface including drywall, gyprock, plasterboard etc. They must be fixed to structurally sound surfaces capable of taking the weight of the bike and rack. Visit our Installation advice page for detailed instructions.

Steadyracks can be installed on any structurally sound vertical surface. Fixings are provided for installing to Timber or Masonry (brick/concrete).

It is NOT recommended that you install Steadyracks into plasterboard or drywall (also known as gyprock). Fixing to drywall, plasterboard or gyprock alone voids our warranty. Your racks must always be fixed to a suitable surface capable of supporting the weight of the rack and the bike. If you wish to install the rack to any other type of surface - such as steel, you will need to purchase additional fixings.

We recommend installing the rear wheel bracket/rest with your Steadyrack bike rack, but if circumstances restrict you from installing it, the rack will still perform as required. You may find that your rear wheel moves more than usual without the rest, however it’s not vital that this be installed.

The perfect mounting height is achieved when a bike is hanging in the rack and the rear wheel is close to the floor, but not touching. This ensures the least amount of rise to load the bike. Bikes will come in
different lengths and therefore different mounting heights which is why we suggest measuring your bikes first by following our installation guide

If you install your racks where they will be directly exposed to the elements, it will void our warranty. They will show signs of rusting and the metal will become dull over time; however, the functionality won’t be affected provided our regular care and maintenance instructions are followed. The plastic is UV treated and should not change appearance if it is not in direct sunlight.

All bikes will vary in their ideal mounting height. Refer to our installation instructions for advice on how to work out your optimum mounting height.

Warranty

Yes – the warranty lasts for a period of one year effective from the purchasing date. You may also register online to extend the warranty. Please read our warranty page on our website for full information.

We work hard to ensure that Steadyrack is manufactured to the highest standard. However if you find a fault or you are dissatisfied with your Steadyrack for any reasons, please visit our returns page for more information.